What Chinese Operators Must Know Before Flying to U.S.

What Chinese Operators Must Know Before Flying to U.S.

What Chinese Operators Must Know Before Flying to U.S.: Planning a trip to the United States can be challenging for Chinese operators as quite specific regulations are in place. Here is what every Chinese operator needs to know to plan a successful mission to the U.S.:

Approvals and Permits
  • For all Chinese registered aircraft (B- registered), a TSA Waiver will be required, regardless of aircraft weight. Chinese companies operating aircraft registered in other countries will need to consult the TSA Waiver regulations in order to check if their aircraft requires a TSA Waiver.
  • All Chinese registered aircraft (B- registered) will require FAA Route Authorization in conjunction with a TSA Waiver. FAA Route Authorization is required for Chinese companies operating aircraft registered in special interest countries of the U.S.: Syria, N. Korea, Russia, Iran, Cuba, Sudan, and China. If the aircraft is not registered to these listed countries,  no FAA route authorization is required. FAA Route Authorizations must be followed exactly when filing flight plans within the U.S.
  • APIS is required for all inbound flights to U.S. and outbound from U.S. legs only.
  • For private and non-commercial flights, U.S. CBP will be contacted only for the initial entry into the country.
  • For commercial non-scheduled flights, U.S. CBP will be contacted for the initial entry into the country and for the final departure from the U.S.  This means that the flight will need to depart from an airport of entry unless an exemption can be obtained (this is relatively rare).
  • For foreign registered aircraft operating commercial non-scheduled flights, a permit to proceed from U.S. Customs is required for each domestic, inter-U.S. leg.  This will require a stamped General Declaration as well as a Permit to Proceed form from each location within the U.S.
Immigration 
  • Chinese national flight crews, to include all listed crew members on the General Declaration, and who will be operating a private/non-commercial aircraft, will require a B1/B2 U.S. Visa for entry into the U.S.  This must be obtained before arrival. Crews of other nationalities should consult the U.S. Visa entry requirements for their country.
  • Chinese national flight crews, to include all listed crew members on the General Declaration, and who will be operating a commercial non-scheduled or a commercial scheduled aircraft, will require a C1/D U.S. Visa for entry into the U.S.  This must be obtained before arrival. Crews of other nationalities should consult the U.S. Visa entry requirements for their country.
  • Passengers of Chinese nationality will require the type of Visa necessary for their visit (tourist, business, etc.).  This should be obtained before arrival. Passengers of other nationalities should consult the U.S. Visa entry requirements for their country.
Handling and Parking 
  • Expect handling to be fairly generic within the U.S. – should you require more specific arrangements, please be sure to ask for this up front and be very specific about any additional requirements.
  • For commercial non-scheduled and private non-commercial flights, expect parking to be on a ramp, typically in front of an FBO or handler.  There are no specific parking bay assignments in most locations within the U.S.
  • For commercial scheduled flights that will be utilizing a terminal or cargo facility, there will typically be gate or parking assignments for these flights.